Biochemistry tests are a group of laboratory tests that analyze various chemicals in the blood to evaluate the health status of an individual. These tests provide insight into the functioning of different organs and systems within the body.

Biochemistry tests are conducted for various reasons, including screening for health problems, monitoring disease progression, evaluating medication effectiveness, evaluating overall health, and pre-surgical evaluation.

These tests provide important information about a person’s health status and can help diagnose and manage a wide range of health conditions, making them an essential tool in maintaining good health and wellness.

The following Profile tests are available below.

Beta HCG, Lipids, hsCRP, Iron Status Profile,
HbA1c, Kidney, Liver Function Tests, Biochemistry Profile, Glucose 6

Full Blood Count

Beta HCG

Beta HCG is a hormone that is produced during pregnancy. This test is used to confirm pregnancy or to monitor the progression of certain cancers. It is recommended to get tested if you are pregnant or suspected of having cancer.

 

Why You should get Tested.

To confirm and monitor pregnancy or to diagnose trophoblastic disease or germ cell tumours

Sample Required?

A blood sample or a urine sample may be required.

When You should get Tested.

A doctor or nurse may request a pregnancy test if they think that your symptoms suggest ectopic pregnancy, a miscarriage, trophoblastic disease or germ cell tumours

Test Preparation

No special preparation is required.

Full Blood Count

Lipids (Cholesterol, HDL, Non-HDL, LDL, Triglycerides)

This test measures the levels of different types of cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood. It is used to evaluate the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. It is recommended to get tested every five years starting from the age of 20.

 

Why You should get Tested.

Lipid profile test is done to evaluate the risk of developing heart disease, to monitor the effectiveness of lipid-lowering therapy, and to evaluate the risk of pancreatitis in people with high triglyceride levels.

A lipid profile typically includes:

  • Total cholesterol, which is all of the cholesterol in all the lipoprotein particles.
  • High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) which is the cholesterol in HDL particles; often called “good cholesterol” because it represents cholesterol carried to the liver for removal.
  • Non-HDL cholesterol (non-HDL-C) is calculated simply as “total cholesterol minus HDL-C”. This is what is often referred to as “bad cholesterol”, as it represents cholesterol which may be deposited to form “plaques”, which can eventually lead to blockages.
  • Triglycerides — measures all the triglycerides in all the lipoprotein particles; most is in the very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL).

Some other information may be reported as part of the lipid profile. These parameters are calculated from the results of the tests identified above.

  • Cholesterol: HDL ratio is the calculated ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C.
  • Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a calculated estimate of the cholesterol that is deposited in blood vessel walls.

Sample Required?

A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm.

When You should get Tested.

  • Your lipid profile is commonly requested by your GP when you reach the age of 40, as part of a routine cardiovascular health check.
  • It may be checked at other times if you are thought to be at increased risk of cardiovascular disease for another reason.
  • It will be checked if you develop another medical condition which can be due to abnormal lipids, such as pancreatitis.
  • If you have a close relative with inherited high cholesterol (familial hypercholesterolaemia).
  • Finally, it will likely be checked at regular intervals if you have been prescribed lipid-modifying treatments, such as statins

Test Preparation

A lipid profile should ideally be measured when a person is healthy. In particular, cholesterol can be temporarily low during acute illness, immediately following a heart attack, or during stress (like from surgery or an accident).

To get a true representation of your cholesterol, you should wait at least six weeks after any illness before having it measured.

In women, cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations are high during pregnancy. Women should wait at least three months after the baby is born to have a lipid profile measured

Full Blood Count

hsCRP

High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a marker of inflammation in the body. This test is used to evaluate the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. It is recommended to get tested every five years starting from the age of 20.

 

Why You should get Tested.

To evaluate the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

Sample Required?

A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm.

When You should get Tested.

Every five years starting from the age of 20.

Test Preparation

No special preparation is required.

Full Blood Count

Iron Status Profile Blood Test
(Iron, Ferritin, Transferrin Saturation, TIBC, UIBC)

This test measures the levels of iron and related proteins in the blood. It is used to diagnose and monitor conditions related to iron deficiency or overload. It is recommended to get tested if you have symptoms of iron deficiency or overload.

 

Why You should get Tested.

To diagnose and monitor conditions related to iron deficiency or overload.

Sample Required?

A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm.

When You should get Tested.

If you have symptoms of iron deficiency or overload.

Test Preparation

Fasting for 8-12 hours may be required before the test.

Full Blood Count

HbA1c Blood Test

 

HbA1c is a measure of average blood glucose levels over the past three months. It is used to diagnose and monitor diabetes. It is recommended to get tested every three to six months if you have diabetes.

Why You should get Tested.

To diagnose and monitor diabetes.

Sample Required?

A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm.

When You should get Tested.

Every three to six months if you have diabetes.

Test Preparation

No special preparation is required.

Full Blood Count

Kidney Function Test
(Urea, Sodium, Creatinine, eGFR)

 

This test measures the levels of different chemicals in the blood related to kidney function. It is used to evaluate the functioning of the kidneys. It is recommended to get tested if you have symptoms of kidney disease or if you are at risk of developing kidney disease.

Why You should get Tested.

To help diagnose and manage conditions affecting kidney (renal) function; may be used as part of general health screening or to screen someone who is at risk of developing kidney disease, or to follow someone with known kidney disease.

Sample Required?

A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm.

When You should get Tested.

When you have signs and symptoms that suggest that you may have a condition affecting the function of your kidneys; when you are being treated for kidney disease; when you have certain risk factors for kidney disease, such as high blood pressure or diabetes.

Test Preparation

No special preparation is required.

Full Blood Count

Liver Function Test
(Albumin, ALP, ALT, Total Protein, Total Bilirubin, GGT, Globulin)

Liver function tests are a group of tests that measure various substances in the blood to evaluate liver function and detect liver damage or disease. These tests include measurements of albumin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine transaminase (ALT), total protein, total bilirubin, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), and globulin.

Why You should get Tested.

You may need to get tested if you have symptoms of liver disease, such as fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain, and jaundice. You may also need to get tested if you have risk factors for liver disease, such as heavy alcohol use or exposure to certain viruses.

Sample Required?

A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm.

When You should get Tested.

You may need to get tested periodically if you have liver disease or if you have risk factors for liver disease.

Test Preparation

No special preparation is needed, but you should inform your doctor of any medications you are taking that may affect the results.

Full Blood Count

Biochemistry Profile

 

The Biochemistry Profile is a comprehensive group of tests that evaluate various substances in the blood to assess overall health and detect any abnormalities or diseases. The profile includes measurements of liver function (LFT), kidney function, uric acid, iron studies, lipids, and glucose.

Why You should get Tested.

You may need to get tested as part of a routine health check-up or if you have symptoms of certain diseases, such as diabetes, kidney disease, or liver disease.

Sample Required?

A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm.

When You should get Tested.

You may need to get tested periodically as part of your overall health care.

Test Preparation

No special preparation is needed, but you should inform your doctor of any medications you are taking that may affect the results.

Full Blood Count

G6PD Blood Test with FBC

 

The G6PD BLood Test with FBC is a blood test that measures the activity of the G6PD enzyme, which is important for protecting red blood cells from oxidative stress. G6PD deficiency is an inherited condition that affects the enzyme’s activity, leading to hemolytic anemia, a condition in which red blood cells are destroyed faster than they can be produced.

Why You should get Tested.

The G6PD + FBC test is recommended for individuals who have a family history of G6PD deficiency or anemia, or have symptoms such as jaundice, fatigue, and shortness of breath.

It is also recommended for individuals who are taking medications that can cause hemolytic anemia or have been exposed to certain chemicals or infections that can affect red blood cell function.

Sample Required?

A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm.

When You should get Tested.

The G6PD + FBC test can be done as a routine screening test or as part of a diagnostic workup for anemia or other blood-related conditions.

It may also be done before certain medical procedures or surgeries that may require blood transfusions.

Test Preparation

No special preparation is needed, but you should inform your doctor of any medications you are taking that may affect the results.