Profile Testing involves comprehensive testing for various health conditions providing insight into specific aspects of a person’s health. It can show if you already have any underlying medical conditions such as diabetes, anaemia or osteoporosis.

Profile testing is used to highlight any important health issues that may need to be addressed before they develop into more serious health problems. It can also be used to determine how your personal lifestyle choices may be affecting your body and blood cells.

Profile testing covers over 40 different markers, including a thyroid function screen and Vitamin D levels. Profile Testing includes:

• Complete blood count (haematology)
• Infection & inflammation markers
• Full cholesterol screening
• Liver function screening
• Kidney function screening
• Muscle damage markers
• Calcium screening
• Potassium level testing
• Sodium level testing
• Iron testing
• Glucose testing

The following Profile tests are available below.

Thyroid Profile, Prostate Profile, Erectile Dysfunction, Well Man, Well Woman,
Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, Female Hormone Panel, Male Hormone Panel

Profile Testing

Thyroid Profile:

This test measures the levels of thyroid hormones and thyroid antibodies in the blood. It is used to diagnose thyroid disorders such as hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and autoimmune thyroiditis. The test includes FT4, FT3, Total T4, Anti-TPO, and Anti-TG.

Why You should get Tested.

If you are experiencing symptoms such as weight gain or loss, fatigue, hair loss, and irregular periods, you should get this test.

Sample Required?

A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm.

When You should get Tested.

You should get this test if you have a family history of thyroid disease or if you are pregnant.

Test Preparation

No special preparation is needed, but certain medications may interfere with the results, so it is important to inform your doctor of any medications you are taking.

Prostate Profile

Prostate Profile:

This test measures the levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and free PSA in the blood. It is used to screen for prostate cancer and to monitor the progression of the disease. The test includes Total PSA, Free PSA, and PSA:Free PSA.

Why You should get Tested.

If you are a man over the age of 50, or if you have a family history of prostate cancer, you should get this test.

Sample Required?

A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm. You are likely to be advised to avoid ejaculation and vigorous physical activity affecting the prostate, such as bicycle riding, during the two days before the blood test. A blood sample should not be taken until at least a week after a digital rectal examination.

When You should get Tested.

You should get this test as part of routine screening for prostate cancer or if you are experiencing symptoms such as difficulty urinating or blood in your urine.

Test Preparation

No special preparation is needed, but it is recommended that you avoid ejaculation for 48 hours before the test as this has been associated with elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels;  PSA may remain high for many months following a urinary tract infection, and for 48 hours following vigorous exercise, especially riding a bicycle.

Erectile Dysfunction Test

Erectile Dysfunction:

This test is used to diagnose the underlying causes of erectile dysfunction. The test includes Lipids (Cholesterol, HDL, Chol:HDL, Non-HDL, LDL, Triglycerides), HbA1c, Testosterone, LFT (Albumin, ALP, ALT, Total Protein, Total Bilirubin, GGT, Globulin), and PSA.

Why You should get Tested.

If you are experiencing difficulty achieving or maintaining an erection, you should get this test.

Sample Required?

A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm.

When You should get Tested.

You should get this test if you are experiencing symptoms of erectile dysfunction or if you have risk factors for cardiovascular disease.
or blood in your urine.

Test Preparation

No special preparation is needed.

Well Man Profile Test

Well Man Profile Blood Test

This test is a comprehensive health check-up for men. It includes LFT (Albumin, ALP, ALT, Total Protein, Total Bilirubin, GGT, Globulin), Kidney (Urea, Sodium, Creatinin, eGFR), Uric Acid, Iron Studies (Ferritin, Iron, Transferrin Saturation, TIBC, UIBC), Lipids (Cholesterol, Triglycerides, HDL, LDL, Non-HDL Cholesterol), FBC, Glucose, FT4, TSH, CRP, PSA, Serum Folate, Active B12, and HbA1c.

Why You should get Tested.

This test is recommended for men as part of routine health screening to check for underlying health conditions.

Sample Required?

A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm.

When You should get Tested.

You should get this test at regular intervals as recommended by your healthcare provider, especially if you have risk factors for certain health conditions.
or blood in your urine.

Test Preparation

Fasting for 10-12 hours before the test is recommended.

Well Woman profile blood test

Well Woman Profile Blood Test

This test is a comprehensive health check-up for women. It includes LFT ( Albumin, ALP, ALT, Total Protein, Total Bilirubin, GGT, Globulin), Kidney (Urea, Sodium, Creatinin, eGFR), Uric Acid, Iron Studies (Ferritin, Iron, Transferrin Saturation, TIBC, UIBC), Lipids (Cholesterol, Triglycerides, HDL, LDL, Non-HDL Cholesterol), FBC, Glucose, FT4, TSH, CRP, Active B12, Serum Folate, CA125, HbA1c

Why You should get Tested.

This test is recommended for women as part of routine health screening to check for underlying health conditions.

Sample Required?

A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm.

When You should get Tested.

You should get this test at regular intervals as recommended by your healthcare provider, especially if you have risk factors for certain health conditions.
or blood in your urine.

Test Preparation

Fasting for 10-12 hours before the test is recommended.

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Profile testing

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a common condition, affecting up to a quarter of women of childbearing age. It is one of the most common hormonal abnormalities in women of reproductive age and is a leading cause of infertility. Although not well understood, PCOS is generally characterised by an excess production of androgens (male hormones – usually testosterone), lack of ovulation i.e. anovulation (the egg is not released by the ovary) and absence of menstrual periods (amenorrhoea), and by a varying degree of insulin resistance. The ovaries usually have many fluid-filled sacs (cysts) hence the name of the condition.

Why You should get Tested.

PCOS is said to be heterogeneous; that is, patients may experience a wide variety of different symptoms to a greater or lesser degree, and vary over time.

A uniform and precise definition of the syndrome is lacking. Women often go to their doctor because they are having menstrual irregularities, experiencing infertility, and/or are having symptoms associated with androgen excess. They may experience

  • Abnormal uterine bleeding
  • Acanthosis nigricans
  • Acne
  • Amenorrhoea or irregular periods (oligomenorrhoea)
  • Decreased breast size
  • Deeper voice (rare)
  • Enlarged ovaries
  • Hirsutism involving male hair growth patterns such as hair on the face, sideburn area, chin, upper lip, lower abdominal midline, chest, areola, lower back, buttock, and inner thigh
  • Weight gain/truncal obesity; fat distribution in the centre of the body
  • Skin tags in the armpits or neck
  • Thinning hair, with male pattern baldness

Sample Required?

A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm.

When You should get Tested.

PCOS is to some extent a diagnosis which is reached after excluding other disorders.

PCOS remains a syndrome (a collection of signs and symptoms) with no single clinical feature which can make the diagnosis.

Your doctor will carry out tests to rule out other causes of anovulation and infertility. Usually you will have a variety of hormone tests to help determine whether hormone overproduction may be due to PCOS, an adrenal or ovarian tumour, or an overgrowth in adrenal tissue (adrenal hyperplasia)

Test Preparation

No special preparation is needed.